LOUISE-MUSE

Dear Louise, some of the pieces have more complicated bases and therefore are not as simple as those in the last post.

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Flood,  2015.  From the side, this piece looks fairly simple, and very different than most. It was created during the time of our recent thousand year rain in Columbia.

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Pushing the bases beyond any kind of norm is really fun.  So is using hardware in an unusual way.

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Male/Female,  2015

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In this piece shapes were composed on a plane to have enough diversity to anchor the window. Then the bookends were placed for added strength. Wooden figures found at the flea market populate it, a bent wood section of a chair encloses an alligator reaching for a shape at the top, while two croquet mallets without their heads frame.  The longest diagonal line is actually a hardened wooden vine from our woods.

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Above and below are two sides of a piece currently on exhibition (but to come back in ten days) for which I have forgotten the name.  It has a complicated base that contains the front two legs of a chair, plus the front seat base with holes for wicker.  A portion of that base with holes is also the crown of the piece.

name? 3

Confused, dear Louise?

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POINT NUMBER THREE ON THE “INCREASE YOUR VISIBILITY” LIST

So I introduced you to my Etsy shop (1), and the previous blog published here will be a guest blog (2) on maybe two sites, one later this week.

The marketing genius that I am following to fame and fortune says that viewers want to see my studio, and how it works.  Gawd.  It is a mess.

We built this big barn, and at first it was simply going to be storage for my tile, which is mostly laid in the summer, Glenn’s studio, and storage for Glenn’s toys.  Trucks, cars.

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Above is a portion of Glenn’s studio, which was planned in the barn design.  The metal walls are in, baseboard heat installed which we never use.

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My area in the barn was never to be a studio, it was for the storage of tile, won by dumpster diving.

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You can see a bit of the tile on the left, on shelves.  These shelves are sixty feet long and go all the way up to the front of the barn.  This is the back left, and there is a garage door to let light in as well as high windows.  Glenn’s studio is in the front right of the barn.  I am second class for sure, and looking at this image, act like it!

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But not this chair.  It is totally first class, and is my studio chair.  I love it and found it in a dumpster. You can see where I sit above, behind the tilting window which still has its glass.

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I sit in the fine chair and stare at a plywood wall which has a piece in progress on it.  Above, we are looking at the side of a big piece, bigger than normal these days.  I do not take good care of my tools, unfortunately.  They are used so much, they are almost never put away.

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Here is the piece now in the studio, the object of my staring from the chair.  These window frames are BIG.  Bigger than normal.  The dark one measures 43″ x 33″ and the aluminum screen is 29′ x 25″.  The table legs are 21 inches long.  I have had trouble using these biggest windows, but last week figured the problem out.  With a bigger window, all the other elements have to be to scale.  Duuuh.

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This piece actually fell on the floor last night after a stupid move by its creator.  Good thing I have these pictures.

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The last evaluation happens upstairs in the gallery where the walls are neutral.  Now to go pick up the big piece off the floor.

 

CODE

The back of our new master bedroom and bath addition is looking Japanese, this addition to our 1939 southern farmhouse.  My guess is that the hipped roof, and the linear windows and posts are doing this.  It doesn’t bother me; I lived in Japan as a child and studied Japanese art history in graduate school, and try to integrate Japanese aesthetics into my work.  Even though, it is surprising that Japan turned up here.

Here is the inside view of the same windows.  These stretch across the bathroom area which takes up the last about one fourth of the room addition.  There is a glass door to the left of these windows.  The windows are old, were free, and are mis-matched.  They are beautifully glazed and it took Glenn about three days to do it.  He is such a perfectionist.

In terms of the international code in effect everywhere now, our builder first thought that the Japanese windows would not pass.    They are too close to the floor, and are too close to the door.  There is not enough wall space in these two areas.  So what the officials tell one to do, is to nail up particle board to the correct dimensions, and then call them.  In this case, because the rest of the windows in the house subscribe to the code, the vast majority, these windows would be ok.  Moot point.
The same kind of “now you see it, now you don’t”  is true for the awful particle board on the deck.  It passed, of course, but who would have a deck like that?  Glenn is making a welded steel banister to replace what you see here.  Neither one of us expected the deck to be anchored by 6″ x 6″ posts.  Glenn is going to take a chainsaw to those posts and trim a lot of that mass away.  But the deck has passed code.  ?????  I don’t get it either.

News flash:  the concrete siding ordered, with a similar texture to the old pine on the house is too wide, and not forgiving enough for us to simply say to overlap it to a greater dimension in order for the new room to have the same parallel lines as the old house.  Now what to do.  We have the weekend to think about it.

These french doors and stained glass window which used to look outside, now look out to the new bedroom.  At the right you can see that there will be old pine siding in the bedroom, which we kept because of its textural interest.  We could strip this away, and use it outside, but there is not enough to do the job.

At least we do have lights!

THE REST ABOUT WINDOWS

We have become good friends, myself and the amazing contractor guy who likes to work around here.  For a South Carolinian, he is waaay open (this is the state where our untrained Governor just closed down our SC Arts Commission, one that 20 years ago was a model for the country—-sorry, this is another post) to creative new ideas.   He is the guy who keeps bringing me windows which would have gone into the landfill,  and I am so happy to get every one of them.  One day a greenhouse will be built with them.

In the interim, other uses are ever present.  Dozens were used in the barn, as windows, and as dividers.

I have started collecting old examples which have had the window panes painted by others.   These windows  are part of my collection of works by passionate but untrained artists.   Many of these naive works are religious in nature; the passion is important to me but not the message.

This image about the road to Calvary is so interesting to me because the artist painted two separate skies.  Don’t know if he was confused, or if he means to illustrate by the second sky a kind of heaven.  Also love the little detail in the tiny brown sandy village that mixes with the land.  It looks like little illustrations in a Sunday school book I had as a kid.  I also am partial to text in an image which puts me clearly in the Middle Ages.

Collecting these works and having all these vacant windows got me thinking about filling some of them myself.  Taking out the glass and replacing it with cement board, I have been adhering broken tile and dishes and found objects within the panes.

This piece is not grouted yet.  Some of these works contain messages in text as this one does, one letter per pane.  As I work on these, they are turning more into landscapes unto themselves.  In the future, maybe they will sit on a table or pedestal and be built like small cities on the order of Oz, all made out of tile and found objects.

Here is something fun to see, my last example before and after grouting.

NEW USES FOR OLD WINDOWS

Never having considered myself window-crazy,  looking at my past posts may be revealing.  Doors are special; whenever dreaming about my high school, doors and passageways are the predominant feature.  Have been back there twice in the last couple of years, and man, seeing the doors was the highlight!

Now windows are looming large, in my renovation, my furnishing and my art.  Wonder what Freud would say.

In  my 1939 built farmhouse, much of the painted history of the house is left  intact.  This window is one example.  After starting to strip paint at the beginning of the renovation, the act of stripping revealed many colors, and it was exciting to see all the different ones.  I decided to keep many things in a half-stripped state to appreciate the history of color in the house.

Above is a detail of the laundry room window.  Below, molding in the old master bedroom.

The molding in the master bedroom is so beautiful, it was not difficult to leave it the way it was.  But painting the tongue and grove walls was then not an option.  The contrast between newly painted walls and the partially stripped molding would have been confusing.  The answer was to sand the walls as well, revealing several colors that they have been as well (although not as many as the molding—wallpaper had been used in the house a lot).

So here is featured what some would call “shabby chic”, but my preference in terminology is “a shabby aesthetic”.  This is NOT the beach.

Above the image shows the opening between the great room and an auxiliary sitting room, before all the wallpaper was removed.  All the layers were so interesting, and like the linoleum we removed, each wallpaper pattern seemed to be specific to a certain decade.  We were amazed.  With everything on walls and ceilings and floors, (think particle board, 1970s paneling, and worse) we had no idea that we had purchased and moved a total tongue and groove house.  I hate to admit the stupidity of our lack of research.

Above is the same opening which is now framed by columns, and a window is hanging between them to further separate the two spaces.  The columns and window now define a kind of corridor between the two rooms as there are few walls in this house.

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The cabinet in the laundry room is a simple window covering for a series of shelves.

More next time on windows creeping into my collecting, and into my art.