WHAT TIME LOOKS LIKE

WHAT TIME LOOKS LIKE

Interesting exercise.

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Bought the laurels above for almost nothing, played with them for a couple of years, and gave up.  It is too hot here for Mountain Laurels, and they all developed holes in their leaves.  So not a lot of money was lost.

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Neither was it with all these Agave.  They all come from one mother, which is in another place on the acreage.  These love the sun here.  Same pots on the columns; common Prickly Pear is in them now.  This pool environment has lots of spiky things, counterintuitively.

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The Holly bushes on either side of the entry gate must be about two years old here.  A plywood box covers the machinery for the pool.

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Above, the hollies make a tunnel over the gate.  Brick has been added to the entry, tile to the pool deck and a little silo to cover the pool equipment. Confederate Jasmine almost covers the back fence now.  It was completely covered about four years ago, so much so that its density absorbed garden space and we had to start over.

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This is Sidney’s Live Oak, planted in 1997, the year he died.  Look at the sandy soil.  It is only with a system and a well that we can have grass.

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Here is the adolescent live oak today.  Have more of these, it takes some work to photograph and crop to make a good comparison.

BALLSY

Yesterday’s post was incomplete.  https://leemalerich.wordpress.com/2015/06/11/bev-lee-has-balls/

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The intensity of balls in this garden is stunning.  Above, an orb hangs from the porch armature.  Unbelievably, there is a glass tree inside this ball, visually linking it to its surroundings.

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Impossible to see the inner tree, this reminds of of how astronauts on the space station describe the earth.  Such a universal shape, this.  I have no doubt that the universe is in sync.  Look at the following.

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One day, Bev-lee was forced to observe one of the difficult parts of Nature.  A predator bird stole a frog from the edge of one of the ponds.  She captured on video the demise of the frog.  The ripping and shredding of the frog on the surface of her outdoor fan took a while.  The bird finally left, and Bev-lee stole towards the pond to see the remains of the poor frog.  One eyeball, one orb was all that was left.  Nature comments.

MORE NEW GARDEN

The garden sits and works on its own as we paint the new gallery, hike the AT, and nurse knees.  The Knockout roses are producing like well-oiled little machines, providing they are dead headed periodically.  Love to help them with that.

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Ginger lilies, transferred from other places on the acreage, are thriving here.  This area is full-sun and then some.  They were not moved until September, but many are blooming now.  Did not expect that.  And behind the ginger lilies is one of the five knockouts acquired at the “dead plant” section at Lowe’s.  One of the five is a double bloom!

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The heads are heavier and look down.  They are as disease resistant and have the same blooming power as the original Knockout.  They were developed by the same people as the original, some years later.

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Above is a detail of a single Knockout rose.  Behind that, you can see sod yet to be removed from the garden.

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Then finish off the line of bricks bordering the garden against that creeping centipede grass.

 

“Finally, atop foliage that is rather midway between a grass and a siberian iris, Crocosmia is related to gladiolus and provides yet another bright torch (most popular color is red, but also in orange or yellow) for the garden.   Crocosmia ‘Lucifer’ is one of the most intensely red perennials for the border, and reliably deer resistant as well.  It can take time to establish a mature clump and you might have to try more than one location to find its “happy spot” in a Spokane garden, but it is worth it.  Of course, if  you visit the Oregon coast, you’ll find that gardeners there consider this flower one of the staples.  It certainly enjoys regional popularity.  But I get out and about in Spokane and I see these thriving in many gardens.  The owner is often proud of the achievement since they may have had to try a couple of times to get it established, but once really settled, it has been reliable.  When yours is a gorgeous display, you’ll carry a torch for this plant as well.”

The description above is from the “Tower Perennial Gardens” blog, and what is stated here is right on.  The only “happy spot” found here for the perennial is within one of my round line of gardens which gets lots of sun.  I have taken for this use Crocosmia given many years ago out of the shade around the pool where it is just a lovely leaf, and dotted it all around this new garden in a pattern.  It sits under the pine straw now, only to prove merit or folly next spring.

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Aha, so with gardening, we are making a composition that we cannot see and react to during creation.  We try to make an interesting statement with plants that have similar sun and water requirements.  We have to consider deer, and varmints under the soil.  An exercise only for the very wise or very ignorant, choose one!

THE TREE-PEE STILL DOES THE TRICK

These snowball bushes are just amazing.  I wish we had a Dr. Seuss-like forest of them.  They are correctly called Chinese Viburnum, and shouldn’t be mistaken for hydrangeas which also bear the common name of snowball bush (which is why we need to use the latin words).

The habit is different between the two, even though they both have sphere-like flowers, and the Chinese Viburnum interfaces better with the tree-pee made to combat deer.

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Taken today, this viburnum is at a little less maturity than peak.  Each snowball starts out light green and slowly whitens.

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Have not noticed any evidence of a deer being near this tree-pee.  I consider this a cure!

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Immature nandina are just behind the spikes that foil the deer.

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A patch of ajuga blooms in one area.  This bush can reach 20 feet high; cannot wait!  It asks me for nothing bu protection, very easy.

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THE SECRET GARDEN

Generations of girls have loved this book.  As a child in the suburbs of St. Louis, I could not imagine such a place as it presented: old walls and secrets and lost spaces that had been forgotten.  Unused rooms in a house. Romantic like a heath would be, or a cliff, or a moor,  or the ocean (any one of them) for that matter.  Anything other than poured cement streets and little measured squares, one house per.

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The aesthetic of Frances  Hodgson  Burnett‘s book, The Secret Garden,  is called back in old movies, black and white.  Jane Eyre, Heathcliff, you know.  Making woodcuts outside in the movie “Enchanted Cottage”.

Advanced now in finding waste for building (today is broken brick day), when I first bought this acreage, it was beyond me to construct a walled secret garden.  So I planted bushes for walls.

Much different now than it was when first planted, you have to live long enough to appreciate it.

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I planted four Nellie Stevens holly bushes,  two on each side of the gate entry, on both the pool side and the garden side.  They were planted too close so their spreads come together and a tunnel could be made.

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You can see in the picture above that I let the garden side hollies grow up before letting the pool side ones.  Used to trim them into cubes.  In the future when all four are the same height, I hope to trim all four tops into one cone.

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I do have walls around my secret garden, but they don’t contain it.

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On a little relief of grass sits a cement bench featuring an edge made of pieces of plates.  My pink oleander is straining for the sun these days.  Changes will have to come.  Ornamental grasses circle its base.

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A mound of azaleas on the right and elaeagnus, the only one in the area that I trim to this extent,  lead into the garden.  During September and October, the fragrance of the elaeagnus  is dazzling.  My mother called this “Russian olive” and it was in her garden.  Don’t remember it being as fragrant as it is here.

The white tile path has to be moved this winter as the bushes are overtaking it.  Always move the path, never the bushes!

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A line of red barberry interfaces another of holly, and they are the walls for the secret garden.  At the top of the picture are the Nellie Stevens hollies.