THE ST LOUIS ART MUSEUM

has installed two works of art from the 1990s in the main gallery, seen to the left upon entering, in separate niches.  Completed in 1991 and 1993, on the leading edge of the movement to make art from the discharge of society (where this initial idea packs the so-called raw material with meaning before its application to composition), we see very different hands at play.  For me, one stands the test of time in content and execution, and one does not.  Damn time.  We need this ephemeral distance to see if we have done good work or not.

It was in the 1960s that the idea of modern recycling began to take hold.  Of course, we all did that before this semantic shift.  We reused Coke bottles and took them back to the store.  We inherited clothes from siblings.  We saved bacon grease.

Develop a new technology, as in breaking down milk jugs,  and artists see a new medium with which to explore a contemporary art statement.  So a while after the idea of reuse, up or down, became installed in our brains, a new art medium was born.  Of course, recycled art employs many kinds of materials.

Playing with textiles most of my life, beginning in the 70s when they were knotted up with the women’s movement, the materials of the textile world were seductive.  It was a great challenge to make art out of materials so beautiful in their “raw” state.  Many were seduced however, and early on, much work relied on the character of the materials and not much else.  The same thing was happening then with handmade paper, and it took years for some to extract themselves from the love of the process and begin to SAY something.  Understand the process yes, even love it, but then take it to another place.

the breaking of the vessels  1991

The piece above is screaming for understanding.  Too much explanation is necessary to understand its meaning.  And there is not a dual meaning.  The best art is in punning.  The artist has been seduced by materials and cannot stop the attraction.  Is more more?   How about now?  Am I good enough now?

Care to guess about what this piece is about?

cell three white marble spheres

The piece above is appealing in its geometry of composition and the simplicity of the statement.  As easy as “in” and “out”.  The three classes of shapes and masses are very different and have their own compositional jobs: containing, reflecting, and simply being spheres.  The artist being a woman, the work is about family and the good and bad aspects of same.  A nurturing space, and a suffocating space.  The family performs both jobs.

Look at the reflection of this piece on the floor.  How much better is this than the glass strewn all over it in the first piece?

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