OUTDOOR SHOWER

I have wanted an outdoor shower for at least two decades after using one in a home on the Hudson River in upper New York state.  It was a fabulous experience with lush gardens all around and a deep back yard ending far out, trees small in perspective at the sunny river.  Much later now, finally one is going in here.

The white area at the bottom of the middle post supporting the deck is this:

While we are not looking out to the Hudson River here, we can create a fabulous shower experience.  The first picture above was taken from the woods.  Although we took out a lot of trees to facilitate the new bedroom, we still have acres between this area and the nearest neighbor.

The crescent shaped shower bottom is a remainder of an old porch we had to destroy to make the new room.  I had tiled it.  Our builder placed it where we wanted the outdoor shower.  Glenn then took his tractor and sculpted the whole area the way we wanted it for water drainage.  So lucky here in South Carolina, between the sand hills and the low country, we have much sand in our soil, and no ground freeze in the winter.  When laying bricks for various projects, you simply have to level them, throw sand on them and wash it down, do this many times, and the bricks are good.

I wanted a slight angle to the path up to the shower, and also wanted to use some of the broken brick that we have.  Starting in the basket weave pattern, as the angle cut in to the shape, the basket  weave drops out and eccentrically placed bricks take over.

Plantings around the bricks do a good job to help secure them.  Papyrus is being planted around the shower base which will grow up high in the same months we would want to use it.  Beyond them, coming towards the foreground of the picture, I am going to plant ginger lilies which get very tall and very fragrant for a good part of the summer.  They will provide great coverage and a great fragrance.

See the grid that is leaning against the deck?  After all other elements of the garden are in, we will position it for coverage and place a wisteria vine we have waiting on it, offering more coverage and wonderful purple flowers for part of the summer.  Wisteria is a real fast grower.

The basket weave pattern was started at the bottom of the steps and created a pad on the ground of about three feet by six feet.  Making a right angle, another three by six rectangle was made before the walk turned back on itself, creating a space for a bush in the vacant space near the deck.  The basket weave pattern is simply an alternation of two bricks placed up and down, and then two bricks placed side to side.  Then you repeat this.

The curved edge of the pathway will cut in and interfere with the basket weave and that is my plan.  This curve was drawn out using parts of broken bricks.  I want to use them, but use them intelligently.  As the curve draws in, less basket weave will be able to fit in, and the broken bricks will take over.

Here you can see how the basketweave pattern is disintegrating and the eccentric bricks are taking over.

I am going to add more partial bricks around the shower base to make it a little bigger, and then start planting more papyrus.

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4 thoughts on “OUTDOOR SHOWER

  1. How does the shower part work. Does Glenn stand on the deck and pour water on you. Ha ! Just kidding. The brick work looks great. I like the idea of wisteria for a shower wall.

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