CODE

The back of our new master bedroom and bath addition is looking Japanese, this addition to our 1939 southern farmhouse.  My guess is that the hipped roof, and the linear windows and posts are doing this.  It doesn’t bother me; I lived in Japan as a child and studied Japanese art history in graduate school, and try to integrate Japanese aesthetics into my work.  Even though, it is surprising that Japan turned up here.

Here is the inside view of the same windows.  These stretch across the bathroom area which takes up the last about one fourth of the room addition.  There is a glass door to the left of these windows.  The windows are old, were free, and are mis-matched.  They are beautifully glazed and it took Glenn about three days to do it.  He is such a perfectionist.

In terms of the international code in effect everywhere now, our builder first thought that the Japanese windows would not pass.    They are too close to the floor, and are too close to the door.  There is not enough wall space in these two areas.  So what the officials tell one to do, is to nail up particle board to the correct dimensions, and then call them.  In this case, because the rest of the windows in the house subscribe to the code, the vast majority, these windows would be ok.  Moot point.
The same kind of “now you see it, now you don’t”  is true for the awful particle board on the deck.  It passed, of course, but who would have a deck like that?  Glenn is making a welded steel banister to replace what you see here.  Neither one of us expected the deck to be anchored by 6″ x 6″ posts.  Glenn is going to take a chainsaw to those posts and trim a lot of that mass away.  But the deck has passed code.  ?????  I don’t get it either.

News flash:  the concrete siding ordered, with a similar texture to the old pine on the house is too wide, and not forgiving enough for us to simply say to overlap it to a greater dimension in order for the new room to have the same parallel lines as the old house.  Now what to do.  We have the weekend to think about it.

These french doors and stained glass window which used to look outside, now look out to the new bedroom.  At the right you can see that there will be old pine siding in the bedroom, which we kept because of its textural interest.  We could strip this away, and use it outside, but there is not enough to do the job.

At least we do have lights!

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2 thoughts on “CODE

  1. If the concrete siding were halved lengthwise would they fit and be more forgiving? eHow says you can “Cut the fiber cement siding as necessary to fit in your installation. You can use a circular saw with a diamond-toothed blade designed for cutting this type of siding, or handheld electric fiber cement shears. Always cut through the back side of the board to avoid marring the area that will be visible.” Love how the stained glass window looks in your room, if I do say so

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